Keynote Speakers

Keynote SpeakersThe Quantum Week 2020 program will feature nine outstanding proven keynote speakers addressing topics of the IEEE International Conference on Quantum Computing and Engineering. The plenary keynotes are intended to fire up the conference attendees at the beginning of each conference day and provide food for thought to stimulate discussion for the networking receptions in the exhibits hall at the end day. The keynote speakers will promote the virtues and state of the art of the different themes of quantum computing and engineering.

Michelle Simmons
Michelle Simmons
University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Michelle Simmons

is a Scientia Professor of Quantum Physics at the University of New South Wales.  She received the 2018 Australian of the Year Award. She has twice been an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow and is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow. She is the Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology. As the founder of Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd, her team is at the forefront of developing a silicon-based quantum computer. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, the American Academy of Arts and Science, the American Association of the Advancement of Science, the UK Institute of Physics, the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering, and the Australian Academy of Science.

Jerry M. Chow, IBM Research
Jerry M. Chow
IBM Research

Jerry M. Chow

is Manager of Experimental Quantum Computing at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center and  IBM’s primary investigator for IARPA’s Multi-Qubit Coherent Operations and Logical Qubits programs. His work at IBM has led to the publication of findings related to the characterization of a universal set of all-microwave gates that can be executed on two transmon qubits, as well as the implementation of a subsection of a surface code fault-tolerant superconducting quantum computing architecture. His leadership at IBM has led to progress being made in quantum error correction and quantum machine learning, as well as the release of the cloud-based IBM Q Experience. He received his PhD in physics from Yale University under Robert J. Schoelkopf.

Anne Matsuura is the Director of Quantum Applications and Architecture at Intel Labs
Anne Matsuura
Intel Labs

Anne Matsuura

is the Director of Quantum Applications and Architecture at Intel Labs. Previously, she was Chief Scientist at Optical Society (OSA) and Chief Executive of the European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF). She also held positions as a senior scientist at a strategic In-Q-Tel, as a program manager for atomic physics at the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and as a special assistant to the U.S. Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Laboratories and Basic Science. Dr. Matsuura was a researcher at Lund University, Stanford University, University of Tokyo, and Boston University. She received a Fulbright Scholarship to Nagoya University (Japan) and is a Fellow of the Optical Society (OSA).

Alán Aspuru-Guzik
Alán Aspuru-Guzik
University of Toronto

Alán Aspuru-Guzik

is the Research Chair of Canada 150 in Theoretical Chemistry and a Canada CIFAR AI Chair at the Vector Institute. Alán began his independent career at Harvard University in 2006 and was a Full Professor at Harvard University from 2013-2018.  Alán conducts research in the interfaces of quantum information, chemistry, machine learning and chemistry. He was a pioneer in the development of algorithms and experimental implementations of quantum computers and quantum simulators dedicated to chemical systems. He has studied the role of quantum coherence in the transfer of excitonic energy in photosynthetic complexes and has accelerated the discovery by calculating organic semiconductors, organic photovoltaic energy, organic batteries and organic light-emitting diodes. He has worked on molecular representations and generative models for the automatic learning of molecular properties. Currently, Alán is interested in automation and “autonomous” chemical laboratories.

Krysta Svore, Microsoft Quantum (QuArC)
Krysta Svore, Microsoft Quantum, QuArC

Krysta Svore

is the General Manager of Quantum Software at Microsoft and leads the Quantum Architectures and Computation (QuArC) group in Redmond, Washington. Her research focuses on the development and implementation of quantum algorithms, the design of a scalable, fault-tolerant software architecture for translating a high-level quantum program into a low-level, device-specific quantum implementation, and the study of quantum error correction codes and noise thresholds. Dr. Svore is Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences. She serves as a representative for the Academic Alliance of the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT).

John Martinis, Google & UC Santa Barbara
John Martinis
Google & UC Santa Barbara

John Martinis

is the Chief Scientist Quantum Hardware at Google AI Quantum and holds the Wooster Chair in experimental physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He pioneered research on superconducting quantum-bits as a graduate student at UC Berkeley. He has worked at CEA France, NIST Boulder, and UC Santa Barbara. While at NIST he invented series-array SQUID amplifiers. Since 2002 his research effort has focused on building a quantum computer using Josephson junctions. In 2010, he was awarded with collaborator Andrew Cleland the “Science breakthrough of the year” for the first demonstration of the quantum ground state in a mechanical oscillator system. In 2014 Dr. Martinis was awarded the London Prize for low-temperature physics research on superconducting qubits. In 2014 he joined the Google quantum-AI team, and now heads an effort to build a useful quantum computer. Dr. Martinis was a NIST Fellow and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

Kae Nemoto, NII, Japan
Kae Nemoto, National Institute for Informatics (NII), Japan

Kae Nemoto

is a Professor in the Principles of Informatics Research Division and the leader of the Global Research Center for Quantum Information Science (QI) at the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Tokyo, Japan. QI aims to bring computer scientists, physicists, mathematicians, and engineers together to establish the foundation of quantum information technology and explore advances the quantum world could provide. Dr. Nemoto’s research focuses on the requirements for true quantum computation as opposed to quantum processes that can be efficiently classically simulated, the generation of optical nonlinearities, schemes for quantum computation and information processing. She collaborates with researchers at the Universities of York, Queensland, Tokyo and the Quantum Information Processing group in Hewlett Packard Labs.

Jake Taylor, NIST
Jake Taylor, OSTP, QuICS, and NIST

Jake Taylor

is the Assistant Director for Quantum Information Science at OSTP. When not on detail, he is also the co-Director and co-Founder of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (QuICS), a Fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), and a Fellow of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).  In 2006, he moved to MIT as a Pappalardo Fellow, before starting his research group at NIST, and joining the JQI, in 2009. With Professor Dianne O’Leary, University of Maryland, he co-founded QuICS, a joint governmental-academic effort to connect computer scientists and physicists working on the fundamental challenge of realizing and understanding quantum coherent devices. Dr. Taylor is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and received Department of Commerce Silver Medal, IUPAP C15 Young Scientist Award, Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal: Call to Service, Presidential Early Career Award for Science & Engineering, and Newcomb Cleveland prize of the AAAS.